The Spire Hospital Bristol, The Glen, Durdham Down, Bristol BS6 6UT Tel: 0117 968 8144

Who has reconstructive surgery?

There are two basic categories of patients: those who have congenital deformities, otherwise known as birth defects, and those with developmental deformities, acquired as a result of accident, infection, disease, or in some cases, aging.

Some common examples of congenital abnormalities are birthmarks; cleft-lip and palate deformities; hand deformities such as syndactyly (webbed fingers), or extra or absent fingers; and abnormal breast development.

Burn wounds, lacerations, growths, and aging problems are considered acquired deformities. In some cases, patients may find that a procedure commonly thought to be aesthetic in nature may be performed to achieve a reconstructive goal. For example, some older adults with redundant or drooping eyelid skin blocking their field of vision might have eyelid surgery. Or an adult whose face has an asymmetrical look because of paralysis might have a balancing facelift. Although appearance is enhanced, the main goal of the surgery is to restore function.

Large, sagging breasts are one example of a deformity that develops as a result of genetics, hormonal changes, or disease. Breast reduction, or reduction mammaplasty, is the reconstructive procedure designed to give a woman smaller, more comfortable breasts in proportion with the rest of her body.

In another case, a young child might have reconstructive otoplasty (outer-ear surgery) to correct overly-large or deformed ears. Usually, health insurance policies will consider the cost of reconstructive surgery a covered expense. Check with your insurer to make sure you're covered and to see if there are any limitations on the type of surgery you're planning. Work with your doctor to get pre-authorisation from the insurer for the procedure.

Other Reconstructive Procedures 

In addition to correcting cuts and other surface wounds, plastic surgeons also regularly treat both cancerous and non-cancerous growths and problems with the supporting structures beneath the skin.

Tumors, both cancerous and benign, vary widely in type, severity and recurrence. The removal method chosen will depend largely on the type of growth, what stage it's in, and its location on the body.

Skin cancers and growths are usually removed by excision and closure, in which the growth is simply removed completely with a scalpel, leaving a small thin scar. If the cancer is large or spreading, major surgery may be necessary, using flaps to reconstruct the affected area.

Your Next Steps...

For more information, available treatments, fact sheets and healing times, please either contact Simon Lee directly, or register for Simon Lee's free email newsletter and we will keep you updated with articles and information on a variety of surgical or non-surgical procedures, as well as news, new techniques and clinic special offers.

You can also request a consultation via video or in person using the Request a Consultation button below.

Request a Consultation Contact Simon Lee Request Our Free Email Newsletter

fraxel skin resurfacing
ulthera ultrasound face lift
coolsculpting liposcultping
pelleve skin tightening treatment
soprano laser hair removal
miradry hyper hydrosis treatment